Auto Repair

Tips Overcoming the Dewy Car Glass When It rains
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Driving in the rain requires more concentration, especially with the emergence of dew on the car winds that disturb visibility and driving distance. Then what is the cause of the glass of dewy car?

Dew that appears in the glass due to the temperature difference between the car cabin with the outside of the cabin, because the temperature inside the cabin is hotter than the cooler outside temperature. This is what causes moisture in the inner glass of the cabin or you can visit the Auto Window Tint in Fort Lauderdale Florida.

Tips Overcoming the Dewy Car Glass When It rains

But keep in mind, the use of air conditioning during the rainy season can also cause the glass to dewy at temperatures that are too cold. It is recommended to set the temperature sufficiently. In addition it is to enable the reciculation feature. This feature is usually present in the AC console with an arrow image from outside the car cabin entrance.

Another way to get rid of dew can be by applying a little hair shampoo in the inner car windshield. But try to keep the shampoo not mixed with water. After that you can visit the Car Window Tint in Fort Lauderdale Florida, a glass that has been smeared with shampoo with a slightly damp kanebo lap. In order not to blur, how to wipe it should also be unidirectional.

3 Steps to Powder Coating Greatness
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3 Steps to Powder Coating Greatness

Powder coating provides a durable, attractive finish for many items. This coating is thicker than wet paint finishing methods, allowing the coated items to withstand hard use for many years to come. It is the leading industrial finishing method and can be found in many applications, including automotive, manufacturing, agricultural, and outdoor equipment production.

Powder coating tools can have many benefits. Powder coating can add corrosion protection as well as providing a non-slip grip to hand tools. Plus, powder coated hand tools can add a measure of personalization with a wide choice of colors, textures, and gloss levels. To coat tools properly, there are several steps involved. Here is a guide to powder coating hand tools, resulting in durable, attractive finishes that last.

Step 1 – Preparation is Key

To ensure a durable, lasting finish, items to be powder coated must be prepared carefully. This means removing old coatings, debris, scale, and oils from all surfaces. Hand tools often have embedded grease and oil in addition to rust or corrosion. Professional powder coating services often use media blasting to remove the scale and corrosion that can harm new finishes. Sandblasting tools before coating is a great way to ensure good adherence of the new finish – it offers a bit of roughness that helps the powder stick to the surfaces of the tool better. Once the tools are blasted, a quick dip into a solvent is a good idea. This removes fingerprints, oil, and grease that can affect the quality of the powder coat.

At this time, it is beneficial to pre-heat the curing oven. Achieving the proper curing temperature is critical; consult the powder manufacturer’s documentation for the right temperature.

Step 2 – Coat the Tool with Powder

In the powder coating process, electrical charges are applied to the powder spray gun (positive charge) and the item to be coated (negative charge). Adjusting the voltage applied to the gun and the item to be coated can affect the adherence of the powder, resulting in a thicker finish if desired. The spray gun may also have pressure adjustments – consult the gun manufacturer and the powder documentation for appropriate PSI settings. The two charges work to attract the powder to the tool surfaces; powder particles will adhere to every crevice and nook if the charge voltage is set properly.

Single-pass spraying generally achieves the best coating. Start the spray to one side of the tool and move smoothly, releasing the gun’s trigger once the spray coats the entire tool surface.

Step 3 – Curing the Tool

Once the tool is coated with the powder of your choice, the next step is curing in a hot oven. As mentioned earlier, there is an ideal temperature range to ensure a good cure. Consult the powder manufacturer’s documentation for this temperature. Too hot of an oven, or too long of a curing time, may result in scorching of the tool surfaces, leaving unsightly marks in the powder coated finish. Too low of a temperature or too short of a curing period may result in an undercure and a coating that isn’t uniform.

By following these steps, a professional-level powder coat can transform old tools into clean, personalized items that are protected from corrosion. Professional powder coating services can help you find the right powders, colors, and textures to suit your specific tool needs.

This article was brought to you by PowderCoat Services, an Orange-County based firm with over 40 years of providing exceptional services to local businesses.

Understanding the Startup Process for a Jet
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Summary: Jet engines rely on a wide variety of different mechanical processes to get it going.

Starting up a jet engine is typically easier than starting up a prop. Essentially, it boils down to an extensive amount of air under pressure, fuel, and the turbine starting process. The most difficult part isn’t on the user’s end but whether or not the engine gets enough compressed air.

Breaking Down the Fundamentals of Starting a Jet Engine

In order to understand how a turbine engine starts, you must know the fundamentals of how it works. The engine will suck a significant amount of air through the intake, then send it through a fan, compressing it. Then, much of the air will go around the engine – known as bypass air, which is used for the thrust and the cooling. The rest of the air will go through the section of the engine that burns.

The “Burn” Section

Air that’s traveling through the hot section will get compressed even further by passing through a series of compressor blades. Once the air reaches the end of the compressor, the air which is now heated, will pass into a diffuser where it begins to slow down. It will then move into the combustion chamber where it will mix with fuel and essentially burn.

The fuel air mixture within the jet engine will burn constantly. Remember, the fuel air mixture is always burning and is not a series of individual explosions. It’s easy to get this mixed up as it can be quite confusing when it comes to the in-depth process. Additionally, one can use a ground power unit from Start Pac for instance, as opposed to relying on the APU to begin the startup sequence to simplify the entire process.