Understanding the Startup Process for a Jet

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Summary: Jet engines rely on a wide variety of different mechanical processes to get it going.

Starting up a jet engine is typically easier than starting up a prop. Essentially, it boils down to an extensive amount of air under pressure, fuel, and the turbine starting process. The most difficult part isn’t on the user’s end but whether or not the engine gets enough compressed air.

Breaking Down the Fundamentals of Starting a Jet Engine

In order to understand how a turbine engine starts, you must know the fundamentals of how it works. The engine will suck a significant amount of air through the intake, then send it through a fan, compressing it. Then, much of the air will go around the engine – known as bypass air, which is used for the thrust and the cooling. The rest of the air will go through the section of the engine that burns.

The “Burn” Section

Air that’s traveling through the hot section will get compressed even further by passing through a series of compressor blades. Once the air reaches the end of the compressor, the air which is now heated, will pass into a diffuser where it begins to slow down. It will then move into the combustion chamber where it will mix with fuel and essentially burn.

The fuel air mixture within the jet engine will burn constantly. Remember, the fuel air mixture is always burning and is not a series of individual explosions. It’s easy to get this mixed up as it can be quite confusing when it comes to the in-depth process. Additionally, one can use a ground power unit from Start Pac for instance, as opposed to relying on the APU to begin the startup sequence to simplify the entire process.

 

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