Inland Truck Parts & Service

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When it comes to truckers, time is dollars. The front end of the drive-shaft is connected to a “energy take-off,” or “PTO,” which harnesses energy from the truck’s transmission and exerts a rotational force on the drive-shaft. On November 2, 1988, a propane delivery truck owned by the Menominee Gas Firm (“Menominee Gas”) pulled into the driveway at the Komanekin home on the Menominee Indian Tribal Reservation. Various components of the drive-shaft were manufactured by Roscommon and supplied to Arrow by Purchasers Merchandise.

In an amended complaint, filed August 31, 1992, Jamie claims that defendants, the makers and suppliers of the drive-shaft elements and associated equipment, are liable for his injuries simply because they failed to supply the manufacturer of the truck with a guard for the drive-shaft or because they failed to warn the manufacturer that a guard was important. On January 29, 1993, defendants Blackmer Pump (“Blackmer”), Inland Truck Parts (“Inland”), Dana Corporation (“Dana”), Purchasers Goods Business (“Purchasers Goods”), and Roscommon Manufacturing Organization (“Roscommon”) filed separate motions for summary judgment.Inland Truck Parts & Service

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Plaintiff Jamie Komanekin was seriously injured when, at age 5, he became entangled in an auxiliary drive-shaft underneath a truck delivering propane gas to his parents’ property. INLAND TRUCK Components, Dana Corporation, Blackmer Pump, Purchasers Merchandise Enterprise, Roscommon Manufacturing Organization, and John Does A by means of Z, Defendants. The pump itself, positioned at the rear of the truck, is driven by the rotation of a 5-foot auxiliary drive-shaft, the rear finish of which is connected to a shaft protruding via either end of the pump.

Inland Truck Parts & Service Expands In Fargo, N.D. The front finish of the drive-shaft is connected to a “energy take-off,” or “PTO,” which harnesses power from the truck’s transmission and exerts a rotational force on the drive-shaft. On November 2, 1988, a propane delivery truck owned by the Menominee Gas Organization (“Menominee Gas”) pulled into the driveway at the Komanekin property on the Menominee Indian Tribal Reservation. Various parts of the drive-shaft had been manufactured by Roscommon and supplied to Arrow by Purchasers Items.

In an amended complaint, filed August 31, 1992, Jamie claims that defendants, the makers and suppliers of the drive-shaft elements and connected gear, are liable for his injuries for the reason that they failed to present the manufacturer of the truck with a guard for the drive-shaft or simply because they failed to warn the manufacturer that a guard was important. On January 29, 1993, defendants Blackmer Pump (“Blackmer”), Inland Truck Components (“Inland”), Dana Corporation (“Dana”), Purchasers Solutions Company (“Purchasers Solutions”), and Roscommon Manufacturing Enterprise (“Roscommon”) filed separate motions for summary judgment.

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Plaintiff Jamie Komanekin was seriously injured when, at age five, he became entangled in an auxiliary drive-shaft underneath a truck delivering propane gas to his parents’ home. INLAND TRUCK Parts, Dana Corporation, Blackmer Pump, Purchasers Items Business, Roscommon Manufacturing Firm, and John Does A by way of Z, Defendants. The pump itself, positioned at the rear of the truck, is driven by the rotation of a five-foot auxiliary drive-shaft, the rear end of which is connected to a shaft protruding via either finish of the pump.

The front finish of the drive-shaft is connected to a “energy take-off,” or “PTO,” which harnesses power from the truck’s transmission and exerts a rotational force on the drive-shaft. On November two, 1988, a propane delivery truck owned by the Menominee Gas Organization (“Menominee Gas”) pulled into the driveway at the Komanekin home on the Menominee Indian Tribal Reservation. Different parts of the drive-shaft had been manufactured by Roscommon and supplied to Arrow by Buyers Goods.

Inland Truck Parts & Service – The front end of the drive-shaft is connected to a “power take-off,” or “PTO,” which harnesses power from the truck’s transmission and exerts a rotational force on the drive-shaft.

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